Mar 4, 2016

Recent articles

Remarks on Dobbs v Jackson Women’s Health Organization

The following remarks are provided by CCLP's executive director Tiffani Lennon. An attack on access to reproductive health is an attack on access to healthcare. Today’s attack on healthcare affects everyone, but particularly those experiencing poverty, with a...

Legislative Update: March 4, 2016

by | Mar 4, 2016

Bill to Watch: HB 1290

Despite declining unemployment rates, many Coloradans – particularly older workers who were displaced by the economic downturn of 2008 — still struggle to find good jobs because their skills and experience have become outdated since the Great Recession shook up the job market. House Bill 1290, sponsored by Rep. Daneya Esgar, D-Pueblo and Rep. Tracy Kraft-Tharp, D-Arvada, extends funding for ReHire Colorado, a successful transitional jobs program, from 2017 until the end of 2021.

Administered by the Colorado Department of Human Services, ReHire Colorado combines temporarily subsidized work, job-skills training and supportive services to help individuals facing barriers to employment succeed in the workforce. Coloradans whose family income is less than 150 percent of the federal poverty level are eligible to apply. HB 1290 is endorsed by CCLP and the Skills2Compete Colorado coalition which CCLP coordinates. The legislation has bipartisan support and is part of a package of workforce bills backed by Gov. John Hickenlooper. Learn more about the legislation in this editorial in The Pueblo Chieftain.

On the Radar
SB 22, which would expand a pilot program to mitigate the cliff effect in childcare subsidies, was passed with bipartisan support by both chambers and is currently running a victory lap to the governor’s office on its way to becoming law. The bill was championed by the Bell Policy Center, supported by CCLP and sponsored by Sen. Beth Martinez Humenik, R-Thornton. HB 1156 expands the coverage of a law that prohibits employers from terminating or disciplining workers who disclose their salary or wages with other co-workers. The bill has been assigned to the House Committee on Business Affairs and Labor.

Off the Radar
HB 1045 was killed by the House Finance Committee by a vote of 8-3. The bill would have removed a requirement imposed by previous state legislation that made payment of Colorado’s Child Tax Credit to low- and moderate-income families with children under six contingent on Congress passing legislation to tax Internet sales.

A recent court decision on the so-called Amazon tax law and Amazon’s decision to begin collecting taxes from Colorado shoppers did not appease lawmakers’ concerns about the bill’s $68 million budgetary impact. CCLP supported the legislation because of its potential to relieve the financial stress of low-income families.

– Bob Mook

Recent articles

Remarks on Dobbs v Jackson Women’s Health Organization

The following remarks are provided by CCLP's executive director Tiffani Lennon. An attack on access to reproductive health is an attack on access to healthcare. Today’s attack on healthcare affects everyone, but particularly those experiencing poverty, with a...